web design & usability

WebDesign & Usability

Trust Is in the Details

From Cyberatlas:

"Web site designers take heed: Internet users are paying attention to the details. A study of 1,649 online users, primarily from the United States and Finland, conducted by Stanford University's Persuasive Technology Lab and sponsored by Makovsky & Company, revealed that little things, such as misspellings, could be detrimental to a site's credibility."

Web Accessiblog

Joe Clark's "Weblog of articles and sites dealing with the topic of Web accessibility": http://www.joeclark.org/accessiblog/

Clark also has a blog of his writing/publishing process for his book, Building Accessible Websites.

Reading McLuhan

From the article by Melanie McBride: "If there's a message of the 'for dummies' age it's that nothing is beyond our grasp. And our desire to believe this is reinforced by trends like usability, which privilege economy over elucidation. No one anticipated it all better than Marshall McLuhan, who whittled big insights into sound bites in order to engage an audience beyond the lecture halls of the University of Toronto [. . .]"

http://www.mindjack.com/feature/mcluhan.html

Text-friendly Authoring

Let me start by trying to dispel a common misunderstanding. "Text-friendly authoring" isn't in the least about eviscerating your web documents by cutting out all the other media such as images, sound, executable code etc. On the contrary: the intention is to use the appropriate media for each purpose, and to use them to the full; but to avoid those other media getting in the way for readers who cannot use them. Nor is it about creating a complete additional text-only version of your site: that might, very occasionally, be justified, but I don't recall meeting a situation where I would have chosen that approach myself, and have reviewed quite a number of examples of other authors doing this where I came to the conclusion that their approach had been misguided [1].

http://ppewww.ph.gla.ac.uk/~flavell/alt/

Web Publishing with XML

Online media conferences are rife with talk of XML. Industry pundits proclaim how well it slices, dices and tenderizes your cherished Web sites. The term adorns headlines in all the weekly rags on the boss's desk, but no one can figure out how to translate the gloss into something of substance for your online presence. It seems to be everything to everyone -- but what is it?

Online Journalism Review

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